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Death And Life, 1908 by Gustav Klimt

Death and Life has two very clearly separated parts. To the left, we see Death. Death is depicted and the classic grim reaper, a grinning skull, covered in a dark robe covered with symbols. The main symbol we see covering Death is that of the cross.

To the right we see life. We see a number of young women lying on a flower bed. We have seen similar flower beds before, e.g. in The Kiss We see a newly created life, a baby, lying in their arms. We see a muscular man holding one of the women and we see an older woman also lying in the middle of the group. The depiction thus covers people, young and old, with a focus on the adults in their best age. There is an over representation of women in the painting which could refer to women as the source of all life. It could also reflect Klimt's preference for depiction women, preferably somewhat undressed. All the subjects are somewhat covered by cloth bearing numerous symbols.

The composition and execution is thus typical Klimt, with symbols taking a center stage.

Only pure colors are used in this paintings, and Gustav Klimt sculpted the figures in his canvase in soft rounded contours. An aging, tired master,

Among the master pieces of Gustav Klimt, Death and Life won the first price at the world exhibition in Rome in 1911.

Gustav Klimt's Masterpieces

  • The Kiss
    The Kiss
  • The Tree of Life
    The Tree of Life
  • The Three Ages of Woman
    The Three Ages of Woman
  • Avenue of Schloss Kammer Park
    Avenue of Schloss Kammer Park
  • Death and Life
    Death and Life
  • Judith I
    Judith I
  • Beethoven Frieze
    Beethoven Frieze
  • Birch Forest
    Birch Forest
  • Expectation
    Expectation
  • Fulfillment
    Fulfillment
  • Portrait Of Adele Bloch Bauer 1
    Portrait Of Adele Bloch Bauer 1
  • Portrait Of Adele Bloch Bauer 2
    Portrait Of Adele Bloch Bauer 2
  • The Bride
    The Bride
  • The Virgin
    The Virgin
  • The Sunflower
    The Sunflower
  • Danae
    Danae
  • Hope II
    Hope II
  • The Big Poplar
    The Big Poplar